Arlington Public Art

Arlington Public Art

REFLECTING ON OUR PANDEMIC EXPERIENCE

ACAC's spring Artist-in-Residence Nilou Moochhala has created a 2-part public art installation exploring the impact of COVID-19 on the community of Arlington. For Menotomy Rocks Park, Moochala has shaped an inviting space for peaceful reflection and healing.  She suspended 100 drawings transformed into colorful meditation flags in a beautiful grove of pine trees.

View NILOU MOOCHHALA'S project here, and find out more!

PERSISTENCE: A COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO PERVASIVE PLASTIC

Sculptor and Crochet Artist Michelle Lougee and a group of community artists called the Arlington Craftivists created 37 colorful sculptures crocheted from PLARN, a “yarn” made from plastic bags, to resemble micro-organisms found in water. The project’s goal is to raise awareness of the deadly impact of single-use plastic on the environment and human health.

View PERSISTENCE here, and find out more about the evolution of this Artist-in-Residence community project HERE!

GO OUT DOORS, NEIGHBORS

Inspired by and extending The Umbrella Arts Center’s summer “Go Out Doors” exhibition on West Concord’s Bruce Freeman Rail Trail, this large-scale exhibition is a collaboration of nonprofits, visitor centers, and artists from across Greater Boston, installed on bikeways in Concord, Lexington, and Arlington.

View GO OUTDOORS NEIGHBORS here!

ARBOREAL ATTIRE

The Arlington Commission for Arts and Culture and the Arlington Historical Society have collaborated to bring contemporary art by the accomplished Boston sculptor Leslie Wilcox to the grounds of the historic Jason Russell House. Wilcox has selected six of her distinctive steel mesh sculptural “garments” – developed over the last 20 years – to create an evocative installation for the Jason Russell House entitled Arboreal Attire.

View ARBOREAL ATTIRE here!

PATHWAYS: ART ON THE MINUTEMAN BIKEWAY

PATHWAYS was launched in 2017 to bring art into one of Arlington’s busiest public spaces: a section of the Minuteman Bikeway that traverses and connects the town’s Cultural District. Installations are sited on a segment between Linwood Street and Swan Place. Each year we commission artists to create site-specific work inspired by the natural and social qualities of the Minuteman.

View all PATHWAYS projects here!

The Arlington Commission for Arts and Culture is supported in part by the Mass Cultural Council, a state agency.